About

Hello dear reader, and welcome to our blog, our journey, our life. These pages are designed to document explain and share our voyage into the realm of self-sufficient homesteading on the side of an Appalachian mountain.

Its rather difficult to surmise ones entire adult dream into a few lines, but try I shall… Mr. Chickadee is really a symbol, a seed planted somewhere deep in my past with tiny gold trimmed Beatrix Potter books read to me by my mother. Stories where the rabbits wore elegant clothing and avoided Mr. McGregor’s wrath while raping his carrot patch. A hunger for a simpler, more pastoral, natural lifestyle has matured into an idea, a plan for a life made with ones own hands. So now, after years of scraping, saving, researching and dreaming, we are ready to set sail!

Through my researching I have found much great information on the Web, but often wished to have some topics covered more thoroughly or at all. In these times I decided others might benefit (and even enjoy) from our documentation, and so we invite you to follow along, to learn, or just watch and homestead with us from your couches or desks.

 

 

85 Responses to About

  1. Anyone who follows along with you will be amazed at what can be done nowadays with antique tools!

    Like

  2. Doug says:

    Excellent, excellent, excellent!!

    My wife and I are thoroughly enjoying your videos and are looking forward to seeing more. As a 60+ yr old, I remember helping my grandfather on a crosscut saw, felling walnuts and cherries that, among other things, eventually became cabinets in my mother’s kitchen.
    The framing slick, the adz and the augers are all old friends…

    Good luck to you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • mrchickadee says:

      Doug,
      Thank you for the kind words! My only hope is that with enough practice and repetition I may approach at some level the skill and finesse which earlier generations found common place.
      Thank you
      Josh

      Liked by 1 person

      • Larry says:

        I would say that you are well on your way, Josh. You already have an amazing amount of skill, along with levels of patience and perseverance that are truly remarkable. I have watched about 20 of the videos on the building of your shop, and your woodworking, masonry and mechanical skills are matched only by your skills in creating very impressive videos. Thank you for sharing with us.

        Like

      • mrchickadee says:

        Thank you Larry!

        Like

  3. ecucuz says:

    Great blog!

    I’m glad to see somebody else as inspired by Roy as I am. I don’t know where I would be without all the books and the PBS series. Keep up the good work, people are slowly realizing the validity of older methods in terms of sustainability, craftsmanship, and well-being.

    Eric

    Like

    • mrchickadee says:

      Thanks! Its quite humbling to think all I have learned Roy did before I was born…and what I find the most challenging was common practice to men trained in the crafts 200 years ago…people are coming around, aS Roy often says, these are not the techniques of the past, they are the techniques of the future!

      Like

  4. Stumbled upon your Youtube account, and from there found your blog. Admire what you are doing, and the time and skill you invest in it. Well done to you both. I don’t know if you do FaceBook, but if you want to, give this group a look. I think you’d fit right in. https://www.facebook.com/groups/GreenWoodWork/ It’s a great group of folks, and a lot of inspiring green wood craft going on.

    Really enjoyed your grindstone frame build, I have my great gradfathers that I need to make a home for.

    have a good day,

    -Nathan

    Like

    • mrchickadee says:

      Thanks Nathan!
      I will be sure to check that out. Im glad you enjoy our blog/videos, we will try to keep them coming. Thats great to hear you have your great grandfathers wheel, do restore it, and use it, he would be proud!
      Josh

      Like

  5. Anne says:

    I came across your posts on You Tube the other day and was mesmerized by your work, your measured pace, care, precision, skill, and the quiet of the surroundings. Thanks so much!

    Like

  6. Andrew says:

    Found you on YouTube and subscribed to your symphony.
    Thankbu for taking the time to share your j journey.

    Like

  7. Andrew says:

    Have you considered strawbale for your main house? I noticed how much work you and your wife put into weaving before the cob and perhaps the bales would offer less headache and an r50 insulation value. With your timber framing skills you could have a castle in no time. Happy new year chickadee family and can’t wait to see what you do in 2016!

    Like

    • mrchickadee says:

      Yes, we have looked into straw bale, and also “light clay straw” which I actually wish I had known about before going ahead with the wattle and daub build, as it would have been our choice. The w&D was fun, and quite lovely in a historic aspect, but lacking in one area, insulation. In any case this build has been a HUGE learning experience and we hope to have made most of our mistakes in this build before something more serious like our house is built. Thank you for your kind words and following our journey.
      Care,
      Josh

      Like

  8. Rachel Monk says:

    Hello There! Thank you for beginning to follow my blog.🙂 I appreciate the support! My husband and I greatly admire what you, your beautiful wife, and adorable dog are doing, and aspire to a similar path. We find all of your content informative and inspiring…and your writing style is lovely and enjoyable to read. Keep up the amazing work!
    Much Care,
    Rachel

    Like

    • mrchickadee says:

      Hello Rachel!
      Thank you for the lovely words. Our idea of sharing our journey sprang forth from the desire to help others learn from our mistakes, tribulations, and experiences. We have had many rocky seas so far, and hope these can be helpful to others. If you are considering a timber frame, we would share the idea of “light clay straw” for the wall infill. Its much better insulation than wattle and daub yet apparently much easier and better than straw bale. I wish we had known before, but it was not meant to be.
      We wish you the best of luck with all your endeavors and let us know if we can help in any way.
      With the greatest regard,
      Josh

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Michael says:

    I am an enthusiast of the old crafts myself and with some limited dedication now and then try out doing things the “old” way. I especially enjoy the fascination I feel whenever I discover what traditional tools are capable of in combination with skill and knowledge. Watching your videos is very educational for me. It’s quite pathleading when one is on the search for sort of an overlook of what the right techniques in harmony can produce. You’re sort of a live online museum! Which is meant to be a compliment.
    Anyways, I wanted to pick up one of your previous comments where you said that these are indeed the techniques of the future. I totally agree. It can only be considered foolish by modernity to cast off knowledge and craftsmanship which has evolved with much intelligence and thought over centuries, and label it “obsolete”. Even from a non-romantic viewpoint the past is indeed the future, considering that traditional materials are the most ecologic, most sustainable and considering the flexibility in repair and recycling, umtimately also the most economical solution.

    So in this sense I hope that I get to read more about your work on this blog, especially your explanations and viewpoints on the methods and materials used.

    Cheers from Europe!

    Like

    • mrchickadee says:

      First, thank you so much for the comment, it quite made my day! As to old crafts, it never ceases to amaze me, we as a specie used these techniques for thousands of years, some hardly changed, as the most precise, economical and efficient means of doing any particular job, until the advent of power tools, then in a few short years, all this highly evolved skill and technique were thrown out the window in favor of what was faster, cheaper, or easier.
      Much of this hard won knowledge was lost outright very swiftly, and much that was retained is only partially understood, and any skill in use today pales in comparison to that which was common place before.
      I believe that our modern society is completely unsustainable, and made cheaply. Everywhere one goes he is surrounded by disposable plastic garbage. Our global economy and infrastructure is based solely on the availability of a cheap nonrenewable resource…is is a simple matter of when this will no longer be sustainable.
      We have chosen a simple life which does not rely on the modern world for our wellbeing, but utilize as little of it as possible for the smaller parts of our life, (communication, transportation namely) we seek a life placing as little a burden as possible on the earth, while increasing our own well being and harmony.
      Thanks,
      Josh

      Like

  10. Amazing, even made more so by the absence of voice. Thank you. Very inspiring.

    Like

  11. jim says:

    I strolled into your youtube videos today and then marched right over to your blog post. Thank you so much for a great afternoon of enjoyment. I love the simple crafts that are anything but simple. I to live in Kentucky on the banks of the Cumberland river where forms the Lake. You were not stretching the truth when you stated this past year has made getting anything outside done a challenge from the wet Spring, Summer, and Fall till now this Winter has also been full of hardships on most.Keep up the good work I will be watching and praying for good weather.

    Like

  12. Alessio says:

    It’s weird when you realize that something amazing is really possible, and there is no jealousy when you discover that what you want to do now but you can’t do, someone else can make it possible.
    Your path inspire people like me before your hands.
    Thank you from Molise, a remote area of Italy.
    Alessio

    Like

  13. Alessio says:

    There is no jealousy when you realize that somebody can do what you want to do but you can’t do that.
    Instead, it’s beautiful to know that there are atavic minds that survive even in the most caothic country.
    Your ideas inspire me before of your hands.
    Thank you from Molise, a remote region of Italy.
    Ciao.

    Like

  14. Sam says:

    I really appreciate your craftsmanship. In the years I worked as a cabinetmaker the rule was to bang the cabinets out. However I did get to make windows and doors using mortise and tenon joinery. The only difference was I was operating massive machinery to make my joints. I think your methods are more eloquent. It’s a real shame you had to deconstruct your masonry heater. I know how hard it is to do decent masonry work. I look forward to any future videos.

    Like

    • mrchickadee says:

      Thanks Sam,

      Its great to hear affirmation from experienced professionals. Win some lose some, many things we do are experiments or our first time, so many mistakes will be made, and lessons learned. We always have several videos in the works, it will never be too long!

      Josh

      Like

  15. D. C. Wilkinson says:

    Evening Josh,
    Happened upon your videos, and as everyone has mentioned here, I find them very inspiring/encouraging/bewildering, so thank you for all of the valuable information you are providing. I write though hoping you might offer some insight for my own future plans. I am currently active duty with the Coast Guard and intend in the next couple of years to purchase our final location(retirement) land so that I may begin preparing it, i.e.- planting orchards, clearing, drilling a well, etc. What have you found to be the benefits/cons of your area of the country in regards to homesteading, lumber availability, climate, intrusive local/state laws? You mentioned the Applachians and from the looks I’d guess you’re somewhere near North Carolina or Virginia, which is what i was considering before as we have family in the Durham and Salem areas of North Carolina. I really don’t want to live anywhere more northern than that as i’ve always been in the south and love the climate/people/geography.

    Also, on a different note. What wax do you use for sealing your timber ends/ natural finish projects?

    Thanks for any insight you can offer. Hope all continues well for y’all.

    -Daniel

    Like

    • mrchickadee says:

      Daniel,

      Thank you for the kind words. Gosh, what a can of worms this could be. We moved here to Eastern KY because of a property I bought online, having no real idea of the social medium we were likely to encounter nor the laws which might regulate our homestead. We were extremely fortunate in some regards, in particular the amazing quality of the neighbors in our area. We found a community full of honest, caring, helpful, hard working people who have made our joinery so much easier. KY also has no building codes, the only issue you will ever have is needing a septic system before they will install power on your land (this is only recently been implemented to help decrease some folks straight piping their sewer systems). Aside from this, the government is really more helpful than a hindrance, they even have many farm programs which will pay all or most of many of your endeavors.
      The land here is covered in a heaven of hardwoods, most everyone has more wood than they know what to do with, so even if you don’t buy a place with lots of timber, your neighbors should be well stocked. There are at least 3 sawmills within 30mi of us as well in the event we didn’t cut our own lumber and timbers. The climate is cooler than the deep south or Texas where Im from, but not nearly like New England. We have 4 separate lovely seasons, quite similar to western NC or VA. I have lived in NC, (stationed at Camp Lejeune) and have heard pretty terrible things about property prices and building codes. Prices for land here are likely to be 1/4 or less what you will find in NC or VA. Its still easy to find good land for 1K or less per acre. Don’t search online, go in person, meet people, its gotten almost impossible to find good deals online anymore, the internet seems to average prices somehow.
      As you can tell I love it here and can’t think of many cons, except the normal issues you will find living far from the city such as scarcity of goods and longer driving distances to locals, but that goes for anywhere in the country.

      The wax I use most often is a mix of beeswax/citrus solvent/some oil(canola, mineral whatever) I heat the oil, melt the beeswax inside and add the solvent, roughly all in 1/3s. Let it cool and you have a cream you can smear on timber ends, finish tools or furniture, and it smells wonderful.

      Thanks
      Josh

      Like

      • vonshill says:

        You mentioned that you can recieve financial help from the government. Is there anything else you do to financially support yourself?
        I have a dream to live the same way you do but i dont understand how to build the homestead and earn money at the same time. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you. (Love your videos and writing by the way)

        Like

      • mrchickadee says:

        Most of the battle is in learning to downsize and live frugally, cheap land can be found, if you build your home you pay your time and nothing more. Skills built doing this can earn money as well.

        Liked by 1 person

  16. Scott says:

    Josh
    Are those usmc issued boots? Great work brother! Enjoy watching the videos and reading the blog. Also thumbs up to your wife, way to go on enjoying hard labor together.
    Scott

    Like

  17. John Vest says:

    Josh, Great information. I live in Bath County, Ky. I have just started my cabin in the woods. Thought about traditional framing but that would just be a garden shed. So I researched and decided on timber frame much like yours. I even have tools from my Grand Father and Great Grand Father I am restoring for the job. If your this way, stop by and lend some advise.
    John Vest
    508 Ferguson Road
    Owingsville, Ky.

    Like

  18. Sandi says:

    All I can say is WOW! I don’t even remember just how I found your videos, but have watched and enjoyed them all. The work you do is amazing and so incredibly beautiful, Josh!

    Like

  19. Cory says:

    Hello!

    My dad and I are watching your videos here on Father’s Day, and we are curious as to how you acquired your craftsman knowledge and those amazing tools.

    Thank you and keep up the fantastic work!

    Like

  20. luis claudio venegas abarzua says:

    Hello , first of all greet and congratulate them on the page and YouTube videos , my name Luis Claudio Venegas Abarzúa am from Chile (South America) , I really like when one can realize his dream and work to realize it.

    Like

  21. C.H. McCants says:

    My headmaster sent this on to me- you may have already seen it, but I think it suits you and your project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CboJzrDhoSk

    Like

  22. Trace Meek says:

    I love watching your videos and reading your words. I hope you don’t mind, I wrote a little piece on my own website and linked to you: https://tracemeek.com/2016/in-praise-of-mr-chickadee/. I don’t have much more to add that the previous commenters on this page haven’t already eloquently written, but since you can’t see me nodding with approval as I read down the page, I’ll just say to you and to everyone here: keep up the great work. It is great to feel the fellowship, and the gratitude we all share for our hands, hearts, and minds, and the ability to live meaningfully through our knowledge and our actions.

    Like

    • mrchickadee says:

      Trace,

      Thank you so much for the kind words, you do us a great honor sir! Its important for us to get all the knowledge and experiences we have gained out there into the world and on the written/video record, people like you who help in this spreading of the “good word” are a true gift in that regard! If we work together we can help many have a brighter, healthier simpler future!

      Blessings to you!
      Josh and Maio

      Like

  23. Lee says:

    Thanks so much to both of you for sharing your journey. It has been a real pleasure and inspiration to watch your videos.

    I’d like to wax nostalgic with your wax recipe (beeswax/citrus solvent/some oil(canola, mineral whatever)), but am not sure where I can find citrus solvent in Canada. Can you share a brand? Or do you make this yourself?

    Thanks for any tips!

    Lee

    Like

  24. José Miguel says:

    Estoy contento de poder confirmar mi inquietud y poder pensar que podremos hacernos nuestra casa de Campo Junto a Mi Esposa, claro utilizando la Mayor cantidad de herramientas que se muestran y por supuesto la técnica, hoy vivimos en la ciudad por trabajo, y ya no estamos contentos, queremos irnos al Campo pronto, creo que es una manera de ver la Vida en estos tiempos, esa forma de construir te deja una lección de por vida Junto a la Familia, felicidades y gracias por rescatar estas formas de Construcción y espíritu de Trabajo.

    Like

    • mrchickadee says:

      Estoy feliz de escuchar que compartes nuestros ideales. Buena suerte en todo, espero que cumplas todos tus sueños. Nosotros creemos que una vida simple en el bosque es lo mejor.

      Like

  25. Ryan says:

    I just wanted to say thank you for posting your adventure. I often dream of a simpler life. As a woodworker/potter. I can appreciate the time and energy you have devoted to keeping these lost arts alive. Thanks again for making my lunch breaks more enjoyable.

    Like

  26. gary davis says:

    My wife and I moved to a little island 17 years ago. Some of the buildings in our clearing came from trees that once grew here. The goats provide us with lovely cheeses and the chickens are just about done laying their beautiful eggs for the year. I find more pleasure in hand tools now and plan to finish out my time here using them.
    It makes my heart soar to watch your videos.

    Like

  27. Sam says:

    Stumbled upon your videos on YouTube. VERY entertaining. I am excited to be able to read through your blog. I have the same dream as you but just not at the same stage yet. I’m glad to see its possible and working out for you. Thanks for sharing and thanks for the education!

    Like

  28. Sam says:

    I stumbled upon your youtube videos and absolutely love them. I have the same plan as you but am not quite at the same stage as you are. I was very surprised to learn your location; close to me and where I plan on setting up. Thank you so much for sharing and the education!

    Like

  29. James Steed says:

    Love your channel and videos. I really enjoy your work with the hand tools, and your partnership with your wife (your Poodle and kitten are awesome, too). I am so pleased with your old-time techniques and fortitude (that work is NOT easy, especially in the rain and cold). Thank you for sharing your journey and best wishes on your life, together!

    Like

  30. Kyle says:

    I recognize the need for anonymity but I would love to have more of you and your wifes background. i.e. what kinda careers you both had, do you two work outside of the property now, how long you have been collecting tools, does the wife have any homemaking/domestic desires as far as doing things the “old way”?
    You often wear pants that are retro where did you find those and who makes them?
    Lastly I am very intrigued by doing things they way they where done for centuries before electricity.
    I am 49 yo but was born to parents that were much older, my father was born in 1918 and was a carpenter and raised me doing carpentry work also. I chose not to make that my life instead I worked in law enforcement. Now that I have retired my wife and I moved to a very rural area in the western plains states. Things are much slower and stress is much less. I feel very much a kindred spirit with what you are doing and looked forward to many more videos and blogs.
    God Bless

    Like

    • mrchickadee says:

      Im a former marine, my wife was a graduate student in peru, we left our respective lives and came out here and regret nothing! My pants are made by “frontier craftsman”

      Like

      • Kevin says:

        First i would like to graciously thank you for your service Josh. I am the father of a former Marine and now Airborne Ranger. I like many here “stumbled” upon your channel and have been mesmerized ever since. Through excellent camera and editing work you make me feel as if I’m in the forest with you as you both erect these beautiful structures through blood sweat and i’m sure a few tears. I wish you and your lovely wife all the best as you continue your ambitious homesteading adventures.

        Like

      • As the father a former Marine and now Airborne Ranger i would like to graciously thank you for you service Josh. I like many here “stumbled” across your channel and have been mesmerized ever since. Through your excellent camera and editing work you make me feel as if i’m in the forest right along with you as you craft these most beautiful structures . I’d like to thank you and your beautiful wife for sharing your homesteading adventure with us. Wishing you both health and happiness as your homestead and family grows.

        Like

  31. Michael Monforte says:

    I recently stumbled onto your videos on Youtube, they are entertaining and educational (my two favorite combinations). My wife and I have recently begun our own journey into the homestead life. Although ours is less traditional we are adding more and more tradition into what we do every day, trying hard to get back to a more sustainable and happier life. I come from a long line of carpenters who have built everything from homes to hand crafted furniture and have to say that your skill level rivals my fathers or grandfathers who spent their lifetimes crafting. My wife and I spent almost twenty years dreaming of returning to the country and homesteading, and were finally getting to it.
    It is good to see young folks like you and your wife learning the skills of yesterday, because they will no doubt be necessary tomorrow. In fact, I see quite a few people really digging into homesteading, hand crafting, and sustainability and that is certainly a good thing. You and your wife are an inspiration to folks everywhere who wish they could, but have not yet taken the plunge. As my wife and I progress in our own endeavor we hope to replace many modern conveniences with more traditional techniques and homemade products. Good Luck, and God Bless. We will continue to watch your progress with great enthusiasm.

    Like

  32. Lloyd says:

    Glad I found your channel. In 1967 our neighbor Earl built my dads garage, by himself with the minimal of tools, including pouring the foundation. You are as talented as he. I am amazed to know two true craftsman in my life time. I’m 69… By the way, what you do with materials I do in electronics, old school, built all my on ham gear and computers and programming.. Love It!
    Keep onkeeping on! – Lloyd

    Like

  33. Julio Jose Cancel says:

    Where can I get captan plans, I would like to build the mideval capstan you built. Also I want to thank you for evrything, I have learned alot. May our heavenly Father, keep blessing you & your family always.

    Like

  34. Condor says:

    Great stuff here dude! Very inspiring! Myself and my partner are on the same journey, I too have been researching doing courses and gathering all the old tools I can in prep for starting. Next year is the big move to our land here in Tasmania Australia, and I just found your blog and channel only to see your path was eerily similar. Your videos are fantastic and you have a great respect for the land and earth you walk on. These skills and tools are deffo coming back to the people, and the right ones will take this forward momentum into the future, consider yourself the new pioneer! Whats best is it seems its a lot of young guys like myself and you guys who are doing it. Critical mass will prevail over the mechanistic method, it must.

    Keep digging for the old tools and keep the vids coming, im actually learning things off you that I havent seen in years of research so you are doing something right!! Your craftsmanship skills are top notch man, obviously a credit to your research and practice. The build looks great, looking forward to seeing the end product however long that takes.

    Like

  35. zetuskid says:

    Josh, In your blog you don’t share a lot about your upbringing.
    I don’t know if that is by choice or what. From your great following, I think people
    Would like to hear more about how you came about where you are
    And how you came to where you are now. How long were you in the service?
    By the way, thank you for your service to our country. We greatly appreciate it.
    Where is your wife from and how does she filll about this type of life?
    Thanks again for your videos and blog, but share a little more about your past.
    Thank you!

    Like

    • mrchickadee says:

      I had a standard upbringing in a normal home in Central TX. I did 5 years active duty in the marines, 3 deployments to Iraq as a 5812 (bomb dogs)
      My wife is from Peru, she was educated as an environmental engineer, but left that life to pursue the dream with me. She loves this life.

      Like

  36. Andrew Meyer says:

    What an amazing journey you both are on! I’m presently playing catchup on your videos as I’ve been fascinated by timber frame construction for sometime. The episode on filling in and finishing the walls was most instructive.

    Keep your collective noses to the grindstone, and I’m looking forward to a book!?

    Andy

    Like

    • mrchickadee says:

      Thank you, we have every intention of drafting up some books in the future to better explain what we feel is just too much for the videos, one reason they are left without narration!

      Like

  37. Kim S. says:

    Stumbled upon your youtube videos when researching wattle and daub with my 8 year old son for homeschooling. We were absolutely enthralled by your workshop videos and watched for 2 hours. I am so inspired by you and your wife and hope that my son finds inspiration for his future in taking things back from machines and using our own skills to know that we can take care of ourselves. Thank you for all you are doing and sharing it with the world!
    Kim

    Like

  38. JR Norris says:

    Hello Josh,
    I also just recently separated and have been looking in western NC and eastern TN for a place to do exactly what you are doing. Do you draft your own plans or have you bought them? I am studying blacksmithing and intend to make all my hewing tools, and was a 1361, so I could draft mine but Idon’t know the load bearing capacities of the different kinds of joins and supports. I also do leathercraft and was excited to see you make your own chisel covers. I have 7 children still at home and am unsure how much time I can devote if I must still “Go to work”at a 9-5. Would you be open to some more in-depth conversation via email or phone on your preparations? My wife and I , my parents and my oldest kids are all very impressed, interested in, and inspired by your work. We are now much more confident that we can do it too. Thanks for sharing.

    Like

    • mrchickadee says:

      JR
      Thanks for the kind words bro! I study traditional buildings to get the timber size and joints, then draft my own ideas, I then reach out to timber framers on Forestry forum or other areas to see what they think of my designs, and if I need to change anything. I will send you an email to what I see below your name here, let me know if there is another I should use.

      Thanks
      Josh

      Like

  39. John Ostroske says:

    How wonderful that you and your wife are having this adventure together! It warmed my heart to see that she carved the leaves into the rope bed you made. I have much respect that she will grab the other end of the cross cut saw. I fell in love with your videos, very informative, but no talking. Imagine my surprise when I discovered your blog and how eloquently you write. In our modern world, it is comforting to know your lifestyle can still be lived. My prayers are for your health and provision to continue living your dream.

    My father had a philosophy of not paying someone for something we could do ourselves. As you can imagine, we learned how to become a jack of all trades. In doing so, we received a gift of satisfaction born from our efforts, problem solving skills, patience, perseverance and a connection to the tools and materials we were using. Your description of what you gained by actually doing versus simply learning about doing something resonated well with my memories. There are times, when I’m working on a piece of old furniture, that I recognize the tool marks and my muscles know what it felt like to make them. There is a connection with the original maker.

    I grew up in an upholstery shop, restoring antiques. My specialty was restoration of wood pieces using old methods and tools to preserve the character and value of the piece. Later, I studied woodcarving in the evenings while attending college. I’ve also picked up some luthier skills and tools along the way. Life took over and I work for the state of Kentucky now in an office job. I still do some work on the side just for enjoyment. It inspiring to watch you going in the opposite direction.

    God Bless you for taking the time to share a bit of your lives. It is very meditative and calming to watch. Thank you and take care.

    Like

    • mrchickadee says:

      John,

      Wow Id love to have met and learned form your father, sounds like a great man. I love seeing the connection to those of the past, here it has namely been in old farm buildings with old hewed timbers and chiseled stone.

      Thanks
      josh

      Like

  40. JOHN says:

    I am thouroghly pleased and entertained with your videos. I enjoy the calmness of them. Where did you learn your skills? Other than just learning as doing. Did you have any formal training? Joinery and furniture craft is my passion and I know just how enjoyable it can be. Keep up the great videos. I appreciate your craft and thank you for sharing.
    The very best to the both of you.
    John

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s